Amour ★★★★ Plus   Leave a comment

Amour

★★★★ Plus

“Amour”:2 hrs 7 minutes Director: Michael Haneke

Story: A profoundly moving story of an elderly couple’s struggle in caring for the dying wife in their Paris apartment.

When we think of French films and the topic of “amour” we normally expect a story of early life’s adventures and sex. Certainly, we expect a romantic side of love, but love that lasts a lifetime with fond companionship, and deep affection is a whole other dynamics and one that is normally missing from cinematography. Enter “Amour”

This is about as far from “The Marigold Hotel” that you can get. It is, however, painfully clear it may be a more realistic depiction of the end of life. Because it is an eye-opener about the challenges, struggles and indignities of dying it is not for the faint of heart. Anne (Emmanuelle Riva) and George (Jean-Louis Trintignant), both in their late eighties in real life, were perfect choices for such an important film. They are brilliant in their interpretation not only of the dying process but its’ effects on both the patient and the care giver. This is acting at its’ finest.

Haneke unravels each scenario as slowly as the process of death itself. The symbolism is not lost. The camera scans the scene in painstaking detail: Each nuance is exposed: a heart-felt look between husband and wife, a view of the piano, the rug, the invading pigeon on the window cell. George evolves in an intense yet gentle manner, caring for his wife with love and common sense; It is a tender, deeply sensitive love story. In naming his movie “Amour” Haneke delivers a story about Love and it’s greatest responsibilities and its sad, final moments. ★★★★ Plus

Posted January 16, 2013 by MeetMeUnderTheEiffel Tower

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